MONTEREY, California — Like father, like son.

Colton Herta parlayed pole position into his second NTT IndyCar Series race win in Sunday’s season-ending Firestone Grand Prix of Monterey.

Herta’s win at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca echoed his father Bryan’s victory from pole in 1998. The younger Herta had to survive attacks from Scott Dixon early in the race and Will Power late. Those attacks brought flashbacks to the elder Herta’s races at WeatherTech Raceway against Alex Zanardi in the late ‘90s.

Racing with the poise and maturity expected of someone 10 years his senior, the 19-year-old brought his No. 88 Harding-Steinbrenner Racing Honda home just .5878 seconds ahead of  Power.

“It was a tough race,” said Herta. “It was either getting hounded by Dixon or (Simon) Pagenaud or Power the whole time, so they definitely didn’t make it easy on me. But yeah, happy to kind of put together what we had in Portland and learn from our mistakes of the tire wear issues and go forward with it.”

Herta’s strategy miscue in Portland by staying out too long in the opening stint would not happen again, the rookie pitting one lap after Dixon in the beginning to stay in the lead.

Meanwhile, series points leader Josef Newgarden was trying to keep in touch with the rest of the  championship hopefuls in order to keep the points lead. Newgarden fell from fourth to sixth after the first stint, but the Tennessee native’s main competition did not gain much ground during the 90-lap race and Newgarden would win his second championship. 

More: Josef Newgarden hangs on to win IndyCar season title

The race’s only full course yellow came on Lap 45 as Conor Daly was trying to overtake teammate Marco Andretti for 13th place. Going into Turn 2, Daly missed his braking point, sliding into the No. 98 Andretti Autosport Honda, and eventually rolling into the sand on the inside of Turn 2, stalling the car. The yellow did not affect race strategy since it came between pit stop windows.

Herta led 83 laps en route to a dominant victory over Power. The 2018 Indianapolis 500 champion tried everything to get around the teenager late, but couldn’t pull off a winning move.

“It was a perfect race,” said Herta. “Whenever you win an IndyCar race, it has to be a perfect race. You can’t really make mistakes and get away with it, just because there’s always two or three other guys on that day that can win. For sure there was a few guys that could win today, and we just outdid them. We had the pace on them, and we were definitely the best today, so we definitely deserved to win.”

Power’s late season run of two wins and a second place in the last four races helped the 2014 series champion secure fifth place in the standings. 

“It was a solid race, just needed to qualify a little bit better,” said Power. “Similar to last year when you qualify seventh, you are not going to have a shot. We had a fantastic car today and we could have won this thing. Obviously we tried to help Simon out there and we sat behind him with probably a better car than him or (Scott) Dixon or (Colton) Herta. I had to give Simon a shot to have a chance at the championship, so I was willing to just sit back.”

Dixon finished third ahead of Pagenaud, the pair still having a chance at the championship. Pagenaud challenged Dixon late in the race, but the No. 9 Chip Ganassi Racing Honda kept the Frenchman at bay during the final 14 laps.

Dixon’s championship chances were gone at Lap 51 following Ed Jones’ retirement. Despite that, the five-time champion still raced hard, fighting tire degradation on the aging pavement.

“(The degradation) was really quite subtle,” said Dixon. “It almost felt like the other guys sped up, you know, it didn’t feel like I slowed down too much until the last five laps, then the last five laps it really fell off, the degradation for us was huge.”